Thursday May 16 at 6pm

Edit
May 16 6:00 pm

Avery-Copp House Museum Sea to Table Lecture Series: The History of Scalloping

Author Paul Doucette, Neptune's Nor'easter

Come hear the story of the history of the New Bedford Fishing Industry, how scalloping developed from a summer fishery, and how and why it is now playing the leading role.   Paul will present a time line of the development of the fishing industry in New England and its metamorphosis to where it is now. Hear examples from the perspective of the fishermen of what was done right, what was done wrong, and why the fishermen at various times did what they did.  New Bedford is the #1 fishing port in the country in terms of dollar value landed, and currently the scallop harvest is responsible for about 85% of the total catch.



Paul Doucette was born and raised in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, the youngest son of Captain Louis Doucette, Jr., a New Bedford fisherman whose career spanned 50-years. His grandfather, Captain Louis Doucette, Sr., was one of the pioneers in the movement from dory fishing to trawling, a change that catapulted New Bedford to fishing prominence. His grandfather was awarded the Carnegie Medal for Extraordinary Heroism for his role in the famous 1910 rescue of the crew of the six-masted schooner, the Mertie B. Crowley, at Wasque Shoals on the southeast side of Martha’s Vineyard. In 1918 Paul’s grandfather was sunk by a German submarine while sword fishing on Georges Bank during WWI, and rowed a 17-foot dory more than 200 miles to safety. His great-grandfather, Amable Doucette, was lost at sea while dory fishing on Georges Bank in 1880. Paul’s family has had a long association with fishing on Georges Bank.

Mr. Doucette holds a degree in Textile Manufacturing from UMass Dartmouth and has managed textile operations in seven U.S. states and in the United Kingdom. He recently retired and returned to his home in Fairhaven, Massachusetts.


Cost
Suggested donation $5


Related